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This Tool Will Save You Tons Of Work

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  • #16
    Originally posted by scottyj View Post
    if you click on harborfreight.com and use this p.n. you will pull up a planishing hammer for 119.97
    hey scotty. looks like ya forgot the part number. i jumped on the site real quick and pulled up the hammer, as well as some anvil's. hope this was the one you were talking about.

    linkage
    apathy is on the rise. nobody cares.

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    • #17
      yeah that's it,sorry fella's,just got home when I posted it .Found it in the winter sale book and wanted[tried] to share

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      • #18
        Originally posted by scottyj View Post
        and wanted[tried] to share
        bro, you did awesome. i couldn't have added that much worth to my post for tools at this point, as i don't have access or knowledge of such things. thanks for bein' here to contribute!
        apathy is on the rise. nobody cares.

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        • #19
          My twister

          Hello
          Saw this post and thought it looked like a great tool. Went out to the shop the next day to 2 frozen screws so I built one. This thing is wicked! Quickest way I have ever seen to pull stuck hardware. I had a busted import hammer driver in my shop so I figured I would just use the parts of it. Discovered that it had a 1/2 drive tip on it, even better! Now I can use sockets or just about anything on the end of this. VERY COOOL TOOOL THANKS!
          Attached Files

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          • #20
            Hehe, really makes it easier, huh? The day my Son built ours, we kept removing screws and giggling like two school girls. It is absolutely amazing. My hat is off to the guy who invented it in the first place.


            I knew lots of our guys here play around with old rusty cars, so I hoped this would help. Glad it did it for you.


            Don

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            • #21
              nice

              great tools and great posts, save lots of time
              Altered Speed & Custom

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              • #22
                I always used a Impact driver for screws . I built a planishing hammer,also a english wheel out of a pillow block bearing and a ford axle bearing works great.

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                • #23
                  The Original tool is called a Punch Driver

                  Hey all, Sears has been selling this tool for more then 50 years now. It goes by the name of "Punch Driver". This tool has been in use for many years and comes with an assortment of heads and is made with a 3/8 socket drive on the business end. You hold it in your hand and hit it with a dead blow hammer, while turning it towards the dirrection you need to go. When you hit it with the hammer, it turns your stuck item.

                  I guess the added section to use with an air chissle is worth the effort over hitting it with the hammer. Just helps to keep your hand and wrist in one piece when you miss your target and slam your hand with the hammer.....lol.........great addition to an old invention.:cool:

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                  • #24
                    That is what a impact driver is.

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                    • #25
                      I purchased a cast steel 90 degree corner clamp similar to this one from Harbor Freight. I thought it would be handy for building benches, installing cross members, or holding any tubing at a 90 degree angle for welding. The only problem was the clamp was made in China like most Harbor Freight tools. There was a lot of casting slag that needed to be removed to clamp rectangular tubing in it correctly. The next problem I came across was it was only 44.2 degrees not 45 degrees. After clamping it in a milling machine & correcting the faces to 90 degrees to each other it works great! It is possible to tack all 4 sides, weld one complete, & weld 2 about half way while still in the clamp. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...temnumber=1852

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