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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    645

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    Quote Originally Posted by biGshiz79 View Post
    looks, good, but I'm curious to the strength of the hole you've drilled thru it.


    you built up the area with weld. MIG is hard, and brittle. I'm sure you noticed this when drilling thru it.

    I'm not sure that the built up MIG weld area is going to be strong enough in the long run to stay put and not crack or fail.
    compared to the forged metal it's welded to, it's going to be the weaker spot. add to the fact that there's a hole in the center of the beam, and it the weakest point in the structure.

    that's two factors that will lead to fatigue, and stress cracks.



    I sure wouldn't want to find out if it's strong enough on the highway by hitting a pothole and losing steering at speed.

    ---

    I think welding in a notched peice of plate would have been the stronger and safer way to do this

    Not trying to poo on your parade..

    Just an observation from a bodyman....
    Well all I can say is that with the painted one (55 Chev), I did it the same way and it's been on the road in two different cars since 1999, plus it's been supporting a big block the whole time. I understand your concerns about embrittlement but from my experience this has not played out that way. Also if you compare these Chev axles to the typical old Ford axle the beam section is actually heavier. I have seen a tube axle that broke at this point, but it had been chromed which can cause hydrogen embrittlement. The chrome layer is very brittle and if it is perfectly bonded to the base material, over time on a part that flexes it will crack right into the steel part. For this reason, chromed leaf springs are doomed to fail, I've seen it many times.



  2. #12

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    ok i see that now. i like it! mind if i poach your idea?
    why??? .. cuz stock sucks!
    1972 chevy shorty low rider
    1986 chevy 1 ton 4x4 crew cab
    (cummins, nv4500,205 )

  3. #13

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    ok i really like your design but its not exactly the look im going for. i have a chevy axle i want to use and i want to put hair pins on it. my question is could i cut a peice of 1/4 plat to fit into the i beam and weld the bracket on. im think someone said the axles wear forged steel, i have never welded forged before and dont really know the characteristics. i have welded cast and had good luck with it. but it has to be done right. is forged the same way?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    645

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    If you can weld cast with no probs, then you'll find it a breeze to weld to these axles or any other that is forged steel. I've never had a welded bracket break off or any other weld failure on them or other forged steel parts. Common sense is the rule here, good welding suface prep, proper heat for good penetration and a steady hand. When welding any brackets on, the larger the contact area, the better, as there are a lot of twisting forces applied to a front axle during suspension movement and braking.

  5. #15

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    ok, thanks i think thats the way im going to go then. and i will probably triple pass all the way around the brackets and grind them smooth. then i wont have to worry about them.

  6. Default

    Old thread, but does anyone have the pictures of the axle that the OP had posted?

 

 
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